Have Scientists Finally ‘Cracked’ the Shatterproof Phone?

03/11/2015
Any owners of the infamous 'indestructible' Nokia 3310 from all the way back in 2000 will know that the idea if the shatterproof phone certainly isn't too good to be true – but the question which has been puzzling scientists and engineers for a while now is whether we can have a phone that incorporates all of the modern conveniences which we've come to take for granted (like the camera or the internet connection) which stands up against the might of clumsy humans?

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After years of little progress it finally looks as if the answer might be a resounding yes – with Motorola promising to prove not only that it's possible, but that it's a lot simpler than initially suggested. The hope is that their new 'X Force' model, designed to incorporate a supposedly shatterproof screen, will not just prove to be an impressive innovation, but a game-changer for the entire industry. Today we'd like to take a look at the technology that is making this possible.

Introducing the Lofty Claims of the Shatter Shield

The technology that Motorola are producing has the rather impressive title of the 'ShatterShield' – sounds great, but how does it actually work?

The answer is with five layers of different protective surfaces which combine together to create a screen which can absorb the shock of a fall. The first layer is a simple and strong aluminium chassis, which forms the inner 'core' of the structure. This is followed up by a flexible AMOLED display (the flexibility is crucial for absorbing shock) and then a dual touch layer which works to ensure that the touch functionality is as resilient as the display.

Finally, they have built two protective lenses into the design, one exterior and one interior, which together work to prevent cracks, dents and other damage. Of course, some sceptical consumers may be inclined to take Motorola's own claims about the impressive durability of this technology with a pinch of salt – however the fact that they are willing to back it up with a lengthy warranty (specifically on the screen) gives us a little more faith. More impressive still is this video from CNN: